oscar statue

I blogged a few weeks back about how depressing the Oscar nominees were this year and how in the midst of wars and beheadings, protests and murders all over the world, Americans just want to escape.  This is evidenced by the fact that the biggest money makers  for Hollywood were all fantasy and sci-fi fare.

More than any other Oscar Award Ceremony  in history, this year’s show was charged with the reality of the world situation despite what the American movie goers voted for with their hard earned American dollars.

The first dose of reality for me was the winner for best short documentary Crisis Hotline Veterans Press 1. This was a humbling moment for me because I had entitled my previous Blog on the Oscars “And The Winner Is…The Suicide Prevention Hotline” not knowing that this film was up for an Oscar.  Making light of such a serious subject made me ashamed.  The fact that I am a mother of a veteran who suffers emotional issues, made me horrified at my blunder.

The next reality check was the winner for Best Documentary, Citizenfour-the story of Edward Snowden and his revelations about the NSA.  Seeing Glenn Greenwald holding an Oscar moved me to tears as, I reflected on how much was risked and the price that was paid to inform the American public about the immense breach of privacy that they suffered by the US government.

Laura Poitras, the Director said in her acceptance speech ,

“The disclosures that Edward Snowden reveals don’t only expose a threat to our privacy but to our democracy itself,” Poitras said in her acceptance speech. “When the most important decisions being made, affecting all of us, are made in secret, we lose our ability to check the powers that control. Thank you to Edward Snowden, for his courage, and for the many other whistleblowers. I share this with Glenn Greenwald and other journalists who are exposing truth.”

The glamour and glitz of the fantasy world of Hollywood was breached by the real world.

We were confronted by the suffering of those with ALS through the story of Stephen Hawking in The Theory of Everything, which won the Best Actor nod and those with Alzheimer’s Disease with the Best Actress win for Still Alice.

We wept during the powerful rendition of the song “Glory” with the realization that the fight for racial equality is not over. We were admonished to continue the fight for gender equality in the workforce by the Best Supporting Actress winner who portrayed the struggles of a single mom in Boyhood.

We were faced once again with the struggle against suicide in a cruel, ridiculing world because of The Imitation Game, which won best adapted screenplay.

It may have been the most political Oscar Award Ceremony in history, but it was also the most meaningful.  The hope is that we as individuals will take these messages and do our part to continue the fight. Just maybe, then we can have the America of our dreams and not our nightmares.